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Research

1. http://www.abbe-lib.org:75/ABBEevents

2. http://www.abbe-lib.org:75/aiken/d02/07/2013/popup/21?incothers=yes&smonth=7

3. http://www.aikenstandard.com/article/20130716/AIK0401/130719627/1031/paws-to-read-program-uses-dogs-to-help-children-read

4. Patty Taylor, Lexington County Public Library youth services librarian

5. http://www.livestrong.com/article/186108-how-to-improve-reading-in-children-reading-below-grade-level/

6. http://www.aecf.org/Newsroom/NewsReleases/HTML/2013/ReadingProficiencyKey.aspx

7. Lisa Gaherty, Lexington Presbyterian Church nursery coordinator

8. Six Literacy Skills Your Child Needs Brochure (Youth Services of Lexington County Public Library)

9. http://www.zerotothree.org/child-development/early-language-literacy/earlyliteracy2pagehandout.pdf

10. http://www.education.com/reference/article/Ref_Five_Skills_Children/

11. Kari D. Weaver, USCA assistant professor of library science and library instruction coordinator

12. http://philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com/photos/gallery.jsp?content_id=55255170&c_id=phi

13. http://phl17.com/2013/07/29/photos-ryan-howard-stand-up-for-literacy-charity-event/#axzz2afa0GBow

14. http://philadelphia.phillies.mlb.com/news/article.jsp?ymd=20130729&content_id=55198138&notebook_id=55197702&c_id=phi

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Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Taylor Jackson

Paws to Help Struggling Readers

July 18, 2013

(Aiken) — The Aiken, Bamberg, Barnwell and Edgefield Regional Library System will continue its five week Paws to Read program Tuesday, July 23. Paws to Read is an event intended for children in grade levels of kindergarten through fifth grade.

Struggling readers will create a bond with and read to a trained therapy dog that loves to listen to stories. A dog handler will accompany the child while he or she reads. Children can bring their own books or use books the library has.

The Paws to Read team of furry friends consists of seven dogs. All seven are present for each time period. Although the event itself is an hour long, the timeframe is divided into four slots. The session allotted for each child is 20 minutes.

Paws to Read is a weekly program that takes place on Tuesdays for the entire month of July. It began July 2 and is scheduled to end July 30. The event starts promptly at 11 a.m. and finishes at 12 p.m.

Paws to Read is open to the public, but requires pre-registration and a signed permission slip for attendance. The event will be held at the Aiken branch of the Regional Library System, located at 314 Chesterfield St.

For more information, please call the Paws to Read event number (642-7585) or the Aiken Regional Library System (642-2020).

Date for Release: July 20, 2013

Taylor Jackson: jacks596@email.usca.edu or 413-5544

Jackson is an English major attending the University of South Carolina – Aiken.

*****

Print News Article

Books in Grass

Is Your Child Reading below Grade Level?

Taylor Jackson

July 22, 2013

(Lexington) – Reading below grade level is a problem that can effect children beginning in elementary school and have lifelong consequences. The Annie E. Casey Foundation states that in 2009, 34 percent of fourth graders tested did not have satisfactory reading skills.

It is always a concern, no matter how old, if a child struggles with reading.

“My son could watch an episode of Nova and tell you everything that happened, but ask him to read something and he would struggle,” said Patty Taylor, the youth services librarian at the Lexington County Public Library. “He had trouble until age eight or nine. At some point, reading just clicks for a child and that’s when it clicked for him.”

Third grade, specifically, is where the struggling readers are separated from the adequate readers. When a child hits the third grade he or she is either well on their way with reading proficiency or struggling to keep up.

“Third-grade reading is a powerful predictor of school success high school graduation. Children who are not ready for school, who miss too many days and who lose ground over the summer months are likely to miss the third-grade reading milestone,” said Ralph Smith, the senior vice president of the Annie E. Casey Foundation and managing director of the Grade-Level Reading Campaign, in a press release from the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

According to the Annie E. Casey website, a correlation exists between a child’s reading proficiency in third grade and being successful academically in later years. Sufficient readers in the third grade are likely to be prosperous not only in academics, but in life and a career too.

Hope is not lost if a child does not make the third grade milestone. A variety of steps can be taken to improve a child’s reading level and get them back on track, should he or she fall behind.

The first step to advance a child’s reading level is to talk to his or her teacher to express certain concerns.

In addition, the University of Texas Center for Reading and Language Arts suggests to focus on the basics of decoding skills as well as word patterns. It is important to find words that involve skills a parent and child have been working on.

It is imperative to involve activities that interest struggling readers; otherwise they will not want to practice. Games, puzzles, or letter flashcards are a few options to choose from. Scrabble and crossword puzzles are two tasks able to help children improve their reading and spelling. Sessions should be fun but focused.

Reading aloud can improve comprehension, listening ability and concentration skills. A study conducted in 2008 that appeared in the “Archives of Disease in Childhood” found that reading aloud provides children with a better understanding of grammar, syntax and story structure. These skills are essential when working to bring a child’s reading up to the correct grade level.

*****

Online Story

WHAT YOUR CHILD NEEDS TO KNOW BY THIRD GRADE

By T. Jackson

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

– Children should know print motivation, phonological awareness, print awareness, vocabulary, narrative skills and letter knowledge.

– A brochure from the Lexington County Public Library suggests books for children, such as “My Splendid Friend,” “Bunny Cakes,” “Hi Pizza Man,” “Little Red Hen,” “Three Bears” and Mother Goose nursery rhymes.

– Reading aloud is an activity parents can do with their child from the very beginning.

(LEXINGTON, S.C.) – “To learn to read is to light a fire,” said Victor Hugo.

“Recognizing words, colors and shapes are skills children learn before even starting elementary school,” said Lisa Gaherty, the nursery coordinator at the Lexington Presbyterian Church. These skills are essential building blocks of what every child needs to know before third grade.

A strong foundation for reading should be built using six important literacy skills that a child should know before he or she hits the third grade.

Print motivation is a child’s fascination and enjoyment in reading. It is important for parents to choose books children are interested in and let them pick out books as well. The interaction involving books should be positive and pleasurable.

Phonological awareness is the ability to hear and play with smaller sounds in words. Books with rhyme, alliteration and animal sounds can enhance this skill. If a book does not rhyme, the parent and child can make up rhyming words. Clapping out syllables of words is another possibility.

Print awareness includes knowing that writing possesses meaning. Parents should point to words as they say them. The orientation of a book is something to consider too. If a book is upside down, parents can tell children it has to be turned around to read it. Scribbling, drawing and writing are encouraged to achieve this skill.

Vocabulary is knowing the names of things, feelings, concepts and ideas. Books with words not used in daily conversation are essential. Explain words and meanings in books, rhymes or even songs. Replace words children are accustomed to with unfamiliar words and have them repeat those words.

Narrative skills include the capability to describe and tell events in sequence, and also to tell stories. Select books with repeated phrases, cumulative tales, and plots with repetition. Telling stories with props can help children remember the order of a story. Having children draw pictures of the story and then retell it is another option. Children could make up their own story as well.

Letter Knowledge is realizing that letters are different from each other, have different names and are related to sounds. Alphabet books, books with shapes and books where children have to find things assist in grasping letter knowledge. In alphabet books, let the child decide what letters they want to talk about.

*****

Profile Feature Story

IMG_4202 (1)

PROMOTING LITERACY: A LIBRARIAN’S MISSION

By T. Jackson

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

– Kari Weaver, a Gregg-Graniteville Library employee, one day aspires to teach up and coming librarians.

– The Gregg-Graniteville Library at the University of South Carolina-Aiken is the third library Weaver has worked in.

– Weaver travels all over campus to teach Critical Inquiry, a class for incoming freshman, as well as library and source evaluation skills.

(AIKEN, S.C.) — Like many young girls, Kari Weaver dreamed of performing on stage -as a fly girl on “In Living Color” to a Rockette dancer. Librarianship did not once cross her mind, even though her mother was a children’s librarian.

“I was always fascinated by every class I would take and I have always loved new things,” Weaver said.

To accompany Weaver’s outgoing and bubbly personality, is something she likes to call the “shiny object syndrome”. New ideas will capture her attention and she’ll want to give them a try.

Weaver’s shiny object syndrome rang true while attending the University of Indiana. She had a difficult time choosing which path she wanted to focus on. She had applied to law school as well as graduate school for English literature.

Weaver’s advisor in college had a wife who was an academic librarian and after meeting with his wife, Weaver knew just what direction she desired to go in.

Weaver received her Bachelor of Arts degree in English literature and business management at the University of Indiana. She went on to get her Master’s in library information and science from the University of Rhode Island.

Weaver is not only the assistant professor of library science, but she is also the library instruction coordinator for the Gregg-Graniteville Library at the University of South Carolina-Aiken.

Weaver enjoys teaching as much as she does librarianship. As of right now, she is taking her education even further by working towards a Doctorate degree in education from the University of South Carolina, focusing on curriculum and instruction.

Working in librarianship has taught Weaver life lessons, such as how to balance her work and home life as well as the importance of a good quality education. Her mother and biggest influence always considered education essential.

Weaver believes in order for public schools to better prepare their students for college differentiated instruction should be an option. Differentiated Instruction is when teachers meet students’ needs by splitting them into groups where they can excel most, such as below, average or advanced rather than simply teaching to the class as a whole.

Her family photos, various colors of lipstick, and cabinets filled with books make an office with fluorescent lighting and limited space feel more like home.

CAPTION: Kari Weaver, assistant professor of librarian science and library instruction coordinator, flips through a book for research information.

*****

Broadcast Script

VO: Begin with shots of Ryan Howard in action on the field.

VO: Ryan and Krystle Howard introducing the event at the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia.

PROFESSIONAL BASEBALL PLAYER FOR THE PHILADELPHIA PHILLIES, RYAN HOWARD, AND HIS WIFE, KRYSTLE, HELD THE 2013 “STAND UP FOR LITERACY” CHARITY EVENT AT THE FRANKLIN INSTITUTE THIS PAST MONDAY, JULY 29.

________________PACKAGE____________________

VO: Guests making conversation over their dinner and cocktails.

THE “STAND UP FOR LITERACY” THE EVENT PROVIDED COCKTAILS AND A PLATED DINNER FOR ITS GUESTS

VO: A few listed teammates with their spouses.

GUESTS INCLUDED FELLOW TEAMMATES CHASE UTLEY, JIMMY ROLLINS, KEVIN FRANDSEN, KYLE KENDRICK, JOHN LANNAN AND LAYNCE NIX.

VO: Dr. William Hite speaking at podium.

SUPERINTENDENT HITE, OF THE PHILADELPHIA SCHOOL DISTRICT, WAS A GUEST SPEAKER AT THE EVENT.

ANCHOR ON CAMERA

THE “STAND UP FOR LITERACY” CHARITY EVENT LAUNCHED THE RYAN HOWARD BIG PIECE FOUNDATION.

THE ORGANIZATION WAS ESTABLISHED APRIL 10, 2013 AND IS DEVOTED TO IMPROVING THE LIVES OF YOUNG CHILDREN, WITH A FOCUS ON ACADEMIC AND ATHLETIC DEVELOPMENT.

THE MAIN GOAL OF THE GROUP IS TO ENGAGE STUDENTS IN LITERACY, LEADING THEM TO A BRIGHTER FUTURE.

CG: Ryan Howard

IN HOWARD’S WORDS, “IF KIDS CAN’T READ BY THIRD GRADE, THEY’RE MORE LIKELY TO FAIL, NOT GRADUATE HIGH SCHOOL AND KIND OF SUFFER THROUGH LIFE.”

ANCHOR ON CAMERA

THE RYAN HOWARD BIG PIECE FOUNDATION IS DOING ITS PART TO BENEFIT YOUNG CHILDREN BY PROMOTING LITERACY AND ACADEMIC DEVELOPMENT.

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