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PROMOTING LITERACY: A LIBRARIAN’S MISSION

By T. Jackson

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

– In the United States, a Master’s degree in Library Information and Science is required for licensure and accreditation of librarians.

– Kari Weaver, a Gregg-Graniteville Library employee, one day aspires to teach up and coming librarians.

– Weaver travels all over campus to teach Critical Inquiry, a class for incoming freshman, as well as library and source evaluation skills.

(AIKEN, S.C.) – Kari Weaver was three years old when an addition to her family came along; her sister was born. Her mother became too busy with the new baby to read her stories and her father never had time to spare.

Weaver was determined and tried to teach herself to read. She began to practice with books her mother had read to her several times before.

“I would work on a book for two or three days and within the next three months, I had taught myself to read with the assistance I was given beforehand,” Weaver said.

Her love of reading continued on in later years. Weaver decided to pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree in English literature and business management at the University of Indiana.

In college, Weaver once told her faculty advisor that she was unsure of which path she wanted to follow. She applied to law school as well as graduate school for English literature.

She had great difficulty making the decision of what she desired to focus on due to something she likes to call the “shiny object syndrome”.

“I was always fascinated by every class I would take and I have always loved new things”, Weaver said.

Her advisor at the University of Indiana told her that his wife was a librarian. After meeting with her advisor’s wife, she knew exactly what direction to go in.

Weaver is not only the assistant professor of library science, but also the library instruction coordinator for the Gregg-Graniteville Library at the University of South Carolina-Aiken.

Working in libraries, Weaver has learned lessons, such as how to balance her work and home life and the importance of a good quality education. Her mother, a retired children’s librarian, always considered education essential.

Weaver believes in order for public schools to better prepare students for college, teachers should meet students’ needs rather than just teaching to the class as a whole.

Weaver received her Master of Library Information and Science from Rhode Island University. Weaver is now obtaining her Doctorate in education from the University of South Carolina, focusing on curriculum and instruction.

Her family photos, various colors of lipstick, and cabinets filled with books make an office with fluorescent lighting and limited space feel more like home.

CAPTION: Kari Weaver, assistant professor of librarian science and library instruction coordinator, flips through a book for research information.

###

Kari D. Weaver

(803)-641-3261

KariW@usca.edu

2 thoughts on “Profile Feature Story

  1. SEE FEEDBACK IN BRACKETS 🙂

    PROMOTING LITERACY: A LIBRARIAN’S MISSION

    By T. Jackson

    STORY HIGHLIGHTS

    – In the United States, a Master’s degree in Library Information and Science is required for licensure and accreditation of librarians. [replace with a different highlight]

    – Kari Weaver, a Gregg-Graniteville Library employee, one day aspires to teach up and coming librarians.

    – Weaver travels all over campus to teach Critical Inquiry, a class for incoming freshman, as well as library and source evaluation skills.

    (AIKEN, S.C.) – Kari Weaver was three years old [see AP style for ages] when an addition to her family came along; her sister was born. [reformat]Her mother became too busy with the new baby to read her stories and her father never had time to spare.

    Weaver was determined and tried to teach herself to read. She began to practice with books her mother had read to her several times before.

    “I would work on a book for two or three days and within the next three months, I had taught myself to read with the assistance I was given beforehand,” Weaver said.

    Her love of reading continued on in later years. Weaver decided to pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree in English literature and business management at the University of Indiana.

    In college, Weaver once told her faculty advisor that she was unsure of which path she wanted to follow. She applied to law school as well as graduate school for English literature.

    She had great difficulty making the decision of what she desired to focus on due to something she likes to call the “shiny object syndrome”.

    “I was always fascinated by every class I would take and I have always loved new things”, Weaver said. [fix quotation]

    Her advisor at the University of Indiana told her that his wife was a librarian. After meeting with her advisor’s wife, she knew exactly what direction to go in.

    Weaver is not only the assistant professor of library science, but also the library instruction coordinator for the Gregg-Graniteville Library at the University of South Carolina-Aiken.

    Working in libraries, Weaver has learned lessons, such as how to balance her work and home life and the importance of a good quality education. Her mother, a retired children’s librarian, always considered education essential.

    Weaver believes in order for public schools to better prepare students for college, teachers should meet students’ needs [individually?]rather than just teaching to the class as a whole.

    Weaver received her Master of Library Information and Science from Rhode Island University. Weaver is now obtaining her Doctorate in education from the University of South Carolina, focusing on curriculum and instruction.

    Her family photos, various colors of lipstick, and cabinets filled with books make an office with fluorescent lighting and limited space feel more like home. [not certain if this is needed]

    CAPTION: Kari Weaver, assistant professor of librarian science and library instruction coordinator, flips through a book for research information.

    ###

    Kari D. Weaver

    (803)-641-3261

    [Overall, this was really good! I enjoyed reading it and without a new minor adjustments, it’ll be perfect!]

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